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Jessica Grigsby
Jessica Grigsby
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Sacramento Accident Attorneys: When your teen is ready for driving?

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It can be very exciting when your teenager is ready to drive, but it can also come with a set of concerns. This is a milestone in ones’ life, especially a teenager, but you will want to help them make this experience a positive and fun process. As the Sacramento accident attorneys we know that teens name parents as their number one influence when it comes to driving. This being said, you being the parent or guardian, should be an example of what good driving behavior is and practice what you preach.

Remembering that driving is a privilege and not a right will help remind the teenager that they need to show that they are ready. A discussion about the expenses that go along with driving should be established for instance, gas for the vehicle and the cost of car insurance. The AAA guide to teen driving safety has a wealth of information for new drivers and parents.

Readiness for driving begins with showing maturity and the ability to make responsible decisions in other areas of the teenager’s life. As a parent or guardian, you should set some rules and expectations to see how well they adhere to guidance and decision making. This could be having the student keep a certain GPA level, or respecting your chosen curfew. You may also want to observe whether they are being responsible about chores and/or jobs that are assigned to them.

Another way to see if your teenager is ready for driving is their maturity level and how they behave around adults and other teenagers. A child who is disobedient, and does not respect direction from their parents, guardian, or the law may show they are not ready to take on the responsibility of being a safe and responsible driver. Observe how they are behind the wheel, do they seem comfortable or nervous? Watch how well they pay attention to the speed limits, and how they respond and adapt to the pressures of being on the road; discuss any concerns the new driver has and discourage road rage and aggressive driving.

Teenagers will need direction when the first begin to drive. Before getting in the car remind them to check around the outside of the car, check the tires, and look for any debris in front or behind the vehicle like glass and nails. Once in the car, have them check the gas levels, and always recommend putting on the seat belt. Also, make it very clear that driving while under any mind altering substance is very dangerous and is strictly prohibited.

Once the individual gets their license a set of rules and guidelines should be put in place. This is to help ensure the new driver to be cautious and safe. Go over the laws and safety rules of the road. Talk to them about distracted driving and how texting or talking on the phone can cause an accident and even death. Let them know that blasting the radio or having too many people in the car talking and laughing can also be a distraction.

There is no rushing when it comes time to driving; it is a process of progression. The teenager should take their time, learn the rules of the road, take some driving lessons, and spend a lot of time practicing with an experienced driver before going on the road by themselves. Safety must come first; the road is not a playground.

It can be very exciting when your teenager is ready to drive, but it can also come with a set of concerns. This is a milestone in ones’ life, especially a teenager, but you will want to help them make this experience a positive and fun process. As the Sacramento accident attorneys we know that teens name parents as their number one influence when it comes to driving. This being said, you being the parent or guardian, should be an example of what good driving behavior is and practice what you preach.

Remembering that driving is a privilege and not a right will help remind the teenager that they need to show that they are ready. A discussion about the expenses that go along with driving should be established for instance, gas for the vehicle and the cost of car insurance. The AAA guide to teen driving safety has a wealth of information for new drivers and parents.

Readiness for driving begins with showing maturity and the ability to make responsible decisions in other areas of the teenager’s life. As a parent or guardian, you should set some rules and expectations to see how well they adhere to guidance and decision making. This could be having the student keep a certain GPA level, or respecting your chosen curfew. You may also want to observe whether they are being responsible about chores and/or jobs that are assigned to them.

Another way to see if your teenager is ready for driving is their maturity level and how they behave around adults and other teenagers. A child who is disobedient, and does not respect direction from their parents, guardian, or the law may show they are not ready to take on the responsibility of being a safe and responsible driver. Observe how they are behind the wheel, do they seem comfortable or nervous? Watch how well they pay attention to the speed limits, and how they respond and adapt to the pressures of being on the road; discuss any concerns the new driver has and discourage road rage and aggressive driving.

Teenagers will need direction when the first begin to drive. Before getting in the car remind them to check around the outside of the car, check the tires, and look for any debris in front or behind the vehicle like glass and nails. Once in the car, have them check the gas levels, and always recommend putting on the seat belt. Also, make it very clear that driving while under any mind altering substance is very dangerous and is strictly prohibited.

Once the individual gets their license a set of rules and guidelines should be put in place. This is to help ensure the new driver to be cautious and safe. Go over the laws and safety rules of the road. Talk to them about distracted driving and how texting or talking on the phone can cause an accident and even death. Let them know that blasting the radio or having too many people in the car talking and laughing can also be a distraction.

There is no rushing when it comes time to driving; it is a process of progression. The teenager should take their time, learn the rules of the road, take some driving lessons, and spend a lot of time practicing with an experienced driver before going on the road by themselves. Safety must come first; the road is not a playground.